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Reprocessing the Microbial Genomic Goldmine: Winner of the ICG13 Prize

- December 13, 2018

Microbial goldmine

Out today is the winner of our ICG13 Prize, presenting work that can aid in revealing new biologically relevant findings and missed genes from previously generated transcriptome assemblies. Teaching old data new tricks, and maximising every last nugget of information from previously funded research. Here we present some insight into why the reviewers and judges […]

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Democratising Data: The African Orphan Crops Consortium & International Data Week

- December 7, 2018

Democratising Data

Pressing Challenges for the Global Research Community Continuous growth of the world population is expected to double the worldwide demand for food by 2050. Eighty-eight percent of countries currently face a serious burden of malnutrition, especially in Africa and South-East Asia. To diversify and stabilize global food supply, enhance agricultural productivity and tackle malnutrition, greater […]

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Swallows and Optical Maps For Ever!

- November 30, 2018

swallow genome

While they say one swallow doesn’t make a spring, one swallow genome makes a welcome contribution to the avian genome club. Taking advantage of the latest genomic and optical mapping technologies, a team of Scientists from the University of Milan, California State Polytechnic University and the University of Pavia, have carried out the high quality […]

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Tegu: the most complete assembly of any reptile genome

- November 28, 2018

Today in GigaScience  we present the genome of the tegu lizard. It is the most complete assembly of any reptile genome so far and will also aid scientists to study other lizards and snakes.  The tegu has mastered a trick that is highly unusual in the reptile world: it can turn on its own heating […]

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Genomes mite surprise you

- November 19, 2018

trombidid mite

In GigaScience, Benjamin Makepiece and his co-authors from Liverpool present genome assemblies of two trombidid mite species, the itch-inducing chigger mite and its more benign cousin, the velvet mite.  The bite of the chigger mite can transmit a life-threatening bacterial disease, scrub typhus.  When the authors explored the gene content of the mites’ genomes, searching clues for […]

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Meet the GigaScience ICG Prize Winners, Pt. 1: Aequatus

- November 14, 2018

Aquaetus

This is the Dawning of the Age of Aequatus Our ICG Prize is over now for another year, and we’ll shortly follow up with an announcement on which of the six winners won the $1000 first prize. To help you see how great all the entries were we will introduce and profile some of the […]

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Women in Science – Helping Break the Final Barrier in Open Science

- November 8, 2018

As an Open Science journal, one of the main aims of GigaScience is to break down barriers. Both in the access of research and the underlying data and code supporting it, and the barriers holding back the researchers themselves. With that in mind GigaScience just organised the Fourth Annual Women in Science Conference, a satellite meeting […]

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Phenomics: from under the gum trees to the world – the 5th International Plant Phenotyping Symposium down under

- October 17, 2018

  Having just attended our first plant phenomics conference – it was great to learn how far the field has progressed and how rapidly it continues to progress with the advancement of new technologies for high-throughput phenotyping. The greater plant phenomics community is trying to collect and define sets of physical and biochemical traits belonging […]

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Making sense of pangenome networks

- October 15, 2018

Navigating Pangenome’s Labyrinth In the two decades since the first genomes were sequenced, with the exponential growth of new and closely related genomes it has become increasingly difficult to visualise and compare their structure. Particularly with the large diversity and difference in genes within microbial genomes. A new computational pipeline, published in GigaScience, makes it […]

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Toads and toxins: The genome of the invasive cane toad

- September 24, 2018

The cane toad Rhinella marina is native to Central and South America. But thanks to humans and the sugar cane trade, the species now thrives also in Australia and other places where it doesn’t belong. The invasive species comes with an unpleasant surprise for native Australian predators, such as snakes or freshwater crocodiles: R. marina kills them with its […]

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