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The genome of a shape shifting butterfly

- May 10, 2017

: William H. Piel and Antónia Monteiro

A high coverage, high quality genome sequence of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana is published today in GigaScience. B. anynana, the squinting bush brown, is a fascinating model species that can modify its morphology in response to environmental clues. The 475 Mb genome assembly, achieved by combining traditional Illumina and long read PacBio data, encodes 22,642 […]

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A Passion for Morphing Passiflora Leaves: Author Q&A with Daniel Chitwood

- May 4, 2017

Passiflora, commonly known as Passion Vines or Passion Flowers is a genus encompassing around 500 species, all of which exhibit such huge variation in leaf shape.  To further understand the unique diversity of Passiflora leaves, a recent paper published in GigaScience, presents a morphometric analysis and unique open dataset encompassing over 3,300 leaves from 40 […]

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Guardians of the Galaxy Workflow

- April 28, 2017

While the Guardians of the Galaxy film franchise has just released its second film, the GigaScience Galaxy series has just published its 10th, 11th and 12th papers. And all without the need of expensive CGI, although we do have our GigaGalaxy server on standby for additional computational support. For those not part of their large […]

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ShoRtcut from bioRxiv to GigaScience

- March 23, 2017

Authors can now submit their bioRxiv preprints directly to GigaScience via the biorXiv platform, at the push of a button. This handy technical integration is another hallmark of biology preprints becoming a normal, accepted, and speedy way of communicating research results. Pre-prints, versions of a scholarly paper that precede formal publication in a peer-reviewed journal […]

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Getting the Buzz on Bee Parasites. Author Q&A with Tatsuhiko Kadowaki

- February 24, 2017

The decline of global honeybee populations are a major environment concern, because of their vital role in our food systems and pollination of flowering plants. Twenty first century ‘Omics is coming to the rescue, and published in GigaScience this week is an article that presents the genome and proteome of a mahor threat to bee […]

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2016: An Eventful Year for GigaScience

- December 13, 2016

This year has been an eventful one, probably too eventful for many.  For GigaScience it has been eventful too, although fortunately in a much more positive way than many have experienced. While there are fears of us entering a “post-truth” era, there is more need than ever for our role as promoters of transparency, reproducibility and providers of cold-hard data. We celebrated our birthday with Mickey Mouse, and experienced many other milestones. On the technical front, this year we have brought you better integration with citable and updatable methods, bigger better and broader data types, and much more. In the tradition of end-of-year-introspection, here is a summary of some of our 2016 achievements as we continue to push the boundaries of innovative publishing of all research objects and reproducible research.

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Ginkgo genome fills an evolutionary hole

- November 25, 2016

New in GigaScience is an article that presents the genome sequence of Ginkgo biloba, the oldest extant tree species. The research was carried out by a team of scientists at BGI, Zheijiang University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences, who tackled and analyzed an exceptionally large genome, totalling more than 10Gb. Ginkgo is considered by some as a “living fossil”, its form and structure having changed very little in 270 million years. Its unique position in the evolutionary tree of life means the ginkgo genome will provide an extensive resource for studying early events in tree development and evolution.

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Remember Remember, It’s Neuro-November!

- November 1, 2016

Halloween may be over, but this November GigaScience will be continuing to fight the zombie (paper) apocalypse and binge on sweet sweet brains (research outputs).

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Personal Genomics Enters a New Phase

- October 11, 2016

Individual human genomes are diploid in nature, with half of the homologous chromosomes derived from each parent. The context in which variations occur on each individual chromosome has profound effects on the action and clinical importance of the genes on it, but this “haplotype” information has been mostly ignored in genomics research to date. A wealth of new data released from the Personal Genome Project via a new Data Note helps fill this gap by releasing the largest set of high coverage whole human genome assemblies with experimentally determined haplotypes to date.

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Jack Rabbits, Lizards and Squirrels, Oh My! Q&A with Taylor Noble

- September 29, 2016

Here is a Q&A with the first author of our first camera trap dataset published in our Data-Intensive Ecology series. Taylor shares his thoughts on why he’s so interested in the endangered blunt-nosed leopard lizard, the usefulness of camera traps in ecology, as well as challenges with big data.

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