Tag Archives: genome

Toads and toxins: The genome of the invasive cane toad

- September 24, 2018

The cane toad Rhinella marina is native to Central and South America. But thanks to humans and the sugar cane trade, the species now thrives also in Australia and other places where it doesn’t belong. The invasive species comes with an unpleasant surprise for native Australian predators, such as snakes or freshwater crocodiles: R. marina kills them with its […]

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Of Mice and Men (and Monkey) Microbiomes.

- August 31, 2018

Monkey microbiome

Monkey Microbiome Business Research just out in GigaScience introduces the macaque monkey to the microbial gene catalogue club, joining other important model organisms including the (also recently published in GigaScience) Rat, Mouse, Pig and Cow. To explain more, in this posting we give some insight into what this data shows, and how this growing library […]

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Genome scale model of a superbug

- March 30, 2018

A genome scale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa published recently in GigaScience will help scientists to fight multi-drug-resistant superbugs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the world’s most dangerous pathogens, causing life-threatening infections. It is increasingly resistant to all antibiotics. The antibiotic polymyxin is a weapon of last resort against the superbug, but P. aeruginosa is increasingly gaining […]

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On the trail of the elusive Solenodon genome. Q&A with Taras Oleksyk

- March 19, 2018

Researchers have sequenced the venomous Solenodon, the last survivor of a branch of mammals that appeared at the time of the dinosaurs. Here we give some behind the scenes insight with some of the authors of this prize winning project, and include a Q&A with lead author Taras Oleksyk. Our latest paper presents a draft […]

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The genome of a shape shifting butterfly

- May 10, 2017

: William H. Piel and Antónia Monteiro

A high coverage, high quality genome sequence of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana is published today in GigaScience. B. anynana, the squinting bush brown, is a fascinating model species that can modify its morphology in response to environmental clues. The 475 Mb genome assembly, achieved by combining traditional Illumina and long read PacBio data, encodes 22,642 […]

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Getting the Buzz on Bee Parasites. Author Q&A with Tatsuhiko Kadowaki

- February 24, 2017

The decline of global honeybee populations are a major environment concern, because of their vital role in our food systems and pollination of flowering plants. Twenty first century ‘Omics is coming to the rescue, and published in GigaScience this week is an article that presents the genome and proteome of a mahor threat to bee […]

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Of big fish and small genomes. Ocean sunfish shines.

- September 12, 2016

The genome of the ocean sunfish (Mola mola), the world’s largest bony fish, has been just been published in GigaScience by researchers at A*STAR, Singapore, and China National Genebank. Here we talk to the researchers, including Nobel Laureate Sydney Brenner, on how the project came together, the slightly unusual sample collection, and how hope this work helps to provide insight into the fish’s extraordinary growth rate and unique body shape.

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Decoding The Tree of Life: Olive joins the Genome Club

- June 28, 2016

Teams of scientists from Spain have published the first complete genome of the olive tree. The specimen sequenced is of the Spanish Farga variety, and is over 1,200 years old. This work will facilitate genetic improvement for production of olives and olive oil, two key products in the Mediterranean economy and diet.

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Sequencing Order: B10K Reaching for the Skies to Decode All Bird Genomes

- June 4, 2015

Announcing this week the B10K project, Guojie Zhang explains how they plan to sequence all the 10,000 bird genomes.

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A firsthand perspective of trialling mobile DNA sequencing

- March 27, 2015

Sam Minot from Signature Science, LLC and Andy Kilianski from the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center are part of a team that has been trialling a new palm-sized DNA sequencer to test whether it can characterize viruses and bacteria. Their findings, published in GigaScience, suggest the device could have potential for disease diagnosis in the field.

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