Tag Archives: genome assembly

Play it again, SAMtools. Q&A with the SAMtools team on 12 years of providing bioinformatics “glue”

- February 17, 2021

SAMtools paper

Today we publish the first update in 12 years describing what’s new in SAMtools, and for the first time the associated BCFtools and HTSlib software library. Here is a Q&A with the authors.

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Q&A with Parice Brandies on the Antechinus Genome

- November 25, 2020

antechinus genome

Parice Brandies presents a Q&A and video on her GigaByte paper on the brown antechinus genome (Antechinus stuartii), a fascinating marsupial with many biological surprises to explore.

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Nectar, fruits, and blood. A genomic view on the feeding habits of bats.

- June 9, 2020

Bats are mammals like no other – airborne, mostly nocturnal, often hidden away in caves, capable of using echolocation for in-flight navigation. No two bat species are alike, however. Their diversity of morphology, life styles and feeding habits is staggering. New bat genomics research published today in GigaScience explores  the footprints of evolution, to explain […]

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The genome of an elusive giant

- January 16, 2020

Today, GigaScience published a report on the genome of a truly unique species: the giant squid Architeuthis dux. The elusive animal is the main character in ancient stories about sea monsters and it is known as “the kraken” in many legends. For a long time its mere existence was questionable, until, in 1857, the Danish naturalist Japetus […]

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Genomic Warning Flag Just in Time for Beach Season: Jellyfish Toxins

- July 4, 2019

Three jellyfish genomes are better than one A new article in GigaScience  might make you squirm if you plan to hit the beach this summer. The published work presents the draft genomes of three different jellyfish species. The international group of researchers, lead by Joseph Ryan (University of Florida), chose to examine jellyfish that present a […]

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Genomes from paradise

- January 30, 2019

New genomic data from five birds-of-paradise reveal genes that are shaped by selection and help explain the origin of their spectacular plumage. Birds-of-paradise, with their elaborate and colorful feathers and their complex courtship displays, are a school-book example of sexual selection. However, little is known about the genetic variants that distinguish the lavishly colored birds-of-paradise […]

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Genomes mite surprise you

- November 19, 2018

trombidid mite

In GigaScience, Benjamin Makepiece and his co-authors from Liverpool present genome assemblies of two trombidid mite species, the itch-inducing chigger mite and its more benign cousin, the velvet mite.  The bite of the chigger mite can transmit a life-threatening bacterial disease, scrub typhus.  When the authors explored the gene content of the mites’ genomes, searching clues for […]

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Toads and toxins: The genome of the invasive cane toad

- September 24, 2018

The cane toad Rhinella marina is native to Central and South America. But thanks to humans and the sugar cane trade, the species now thrives also in Australia and other places where it doesn’t belong. The invasive species comes with an unpleasant surprise for native Australian predators, such as snakes or freshwater crocodiles: R. marina kills them with its […]

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On the trail of the elusive Solenodon genome. Q&A with Taras Oleksyk

- March 19, 2018

Researchers have sequenced the venomous Solenodon, the last survivor of a branch of mammals that appeared at the time of the dinosaurs. Here we give some behind the scenes insight with some of the authors of this prize winning project, and include a Q&A with lead author Taras Oleksyk. Our latest paper presents a draft […]

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Of big fish and small genomes. Ocean sunfish shines.

- September 12, 2016

The genome of the ocean sunfish (Mola mola), the world’s largest bony fish, has been just been published in GigaScience by researchers at A*STAR, Singapore, and China National Genebank. Here we talk to the researchers, including Nobel Laureate Sydney Brenner, on how the project came together, the slightly unusual sample collection, and how hope this work helps to provide insight into the fish’s extraordinary growth rate and unique body shape.

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