Tag Archives: guest post

Guest posting: Building a PhenoMeNal metabolomics e-infrastructure

- July 19, 2016

David Johnson and the PhenoMeNal consortium have a guest posting on their efforts in building an open, community-supported, e-infrastructure for medical metabolomics data, and how they are seeking community feedback on the requirements for the data infrastructures needed.

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Guest Blog: Mind the Zika Data Gap.

- February 15, 2016

Following his previous insight into the Ebola epidemic, we have another data oriented guest posting from Michael Dean, this time pooling together various available data to present a non-specialist view of the Zika crisis.

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Guest Posting: Help Crowdfund the “Community Cactus”

- March 13, 2015

Peng Jiang and Hui Guo from the University of Georgia provide a guest post covering their crowdfunding efforts to sequence the first cactus genome.

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Synthetic Genomics: Redesign and synthesis of the first multicellular eukaryotic genome

- January 30, 2015

Guest post from researchers at BGI and Edinburgh University on where organismal scale “synthetic genomics” is going.

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Guest Blog: The Ebola Epidemic revisited – where are we in 2015?

- January 15, 2015

Following from his guest blog in October on “Approaches and resources to slow the spread of infection”, Michael Dean from the Center of Cancer Research at the NIH uses his data oriented approach to give an update of where the Ebola epidemic is. While there may be less media coverage (apart from in the UK), this doesn’t relate to the […]

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Guest Blog: The 2014 Ebola Epidemic: Approaches and resources to slow the spread of infection

- October 27, 2014

The Ebola pandemic presents one of the most terrifying world health crises in modern times, with devastating consequences in Western Africa [as this goes to press there are now over 10,000 infections and almost 5,000 deaths]. There is a vast amount of data on this crisis available in rapidly published articles and on the internet […]

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Guest Blog: Challenges and opportunities with sharing neuroimaging data

- October 19, 2014

Here we present a guest blog by our Editorial Board Member Russell Poldrack, Professor of Psychology at Stanford University, who highlights the challenges and opportunities surrounding imaging data to enable the neuroscience community to “stand on the shoulders of giants”. The sharing of neuroimaging data is an idea whose time has finally come, but many […]

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Guest posting: Optical Mapping allows comprehensiveness and scalability that modern sequencing cannot provide

- July 21, 2014

Shedding light on what the Optical Mapping System can provide for genome analysis, here we present a guest posting from optical mapping pioneer and developer (and GigaScience Editorial Board Member), David C. Schwartz, who is a Professor of Chemistry and Genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Taking the Google Maps approach: providing comprehensive, scalable worldviews […]

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Guest posting: Let’s crowdfund a fern genome that will blow your mind

- June 16, 2014

Following our efforts encouraging open-science projects, such as the community funded “Peoples Parrot” and OpenAshDieback, today we have a guest posting from Fay-Wei Li and Kathleen Pryer from the Department of Biology at Duke University covering a crowdfunding effort to sequence the Azolla genome.  They have already raised over $4,000 and have 25 days remaining until […]

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Guest posting: Many journals have determined that they can assist in data sharing

- April 23, 2014

Today we have a guest posting from F1000’s Iain Hrynaszkiewicz covering the topic of medical data sharing One of the world’s most influential medical journals recently highlighted data sharing as an important issue to be addressed if we are to improve the quality of reporting of biomedical research. However, the journal may have overlooked strong […]

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