Tag Archives: parasites

Genomes mite surprise you

- November 19, 2018

trombidid mite

In GigaScience, Benjamin Makepiece and his co-authors from Liverpool present genome assemblies of two trombidid mite species, the itch-inducing chigger mite and its more benign cousin, the velvet mite.  The bite of the chigger mite can transmit a life-threatening bacterial disease, scrub typhus.  When the authors explored the gene content of the mites’ genomes, searching clues for […]

Continue reading

0 comments

Research Parasites Wanted. Q&A with Casey Greene & Brian Byrd

- September 14, 2017

As a journal focussed on open science we are big promoters of research parasites (and research on parasites), and try to feeds them with open data and tools. It is therefore appropriate this is the second year GigaScience has supported and sponsored the Research Parasite awards. In one of our Q&As, organisers Casey Greene and […]

Continue reading

0 comments

Getting the Buzz on Bee Parasites. Author Q&A with Tatsuhiko Kadowaki

- February 24, 2017

The decline of global honeybee populations are a major environment concern, because of their vital role in our food systems and pollination of flowering plants. Twenty first century ‘Omics is coming to the rescue, and published in GigaScience this week is an article that presents the genome and proteome of a mahor threat to bee […]

Continue reading

0 comments

Of Parasites & Protocols, Part 3. Author Q&A with Tony Papenfuss

- June 16, 2016

Following our announcement this month of a new collaboration and integration with protocols.io, we’ve gone into more detail on the first two papers that have utilised this open access repository of scientific methods and collaborative protocol-centered platform. To give some insight into his work, we have one of our author Q&As with Associate Professor Tony Papenfuss, lead author of our scabies genome paper.

Continue reading

0 comments

Reproducible Research Resources for Research(ing) Parasites

- June 3, 2016

Two new research papers on scabies and tapeworms published today showcase a new collaboration with protocols.io. This demonstrates a new way to share scientific methods that allows scientists to better repeat and build upon these complicated studies on difficult-to-study parasites. It also highlights a new means of writing all research papers with citable methods that can be updated over time.

Continue reading

0 comments